Mountain Safety

The Colorado Skier Safety Act
Under Colorado law, a skier assumes the risk of any injury to person or property resulting from any of the inherent dangers and risks of skiing and may not recover from any ski area operator for any injury resulting from any of the inherent dangers and risks of skiing including: changing weather conditions; existing and changing snow conditions; bare spots; rocks; stumps; trees; collision with natural objects, man- made objects or other skiers; variations in the terrain; and the failure of the skiers to ski within their own abilities.

Your Responsibility Code
Skiing and snowboarding can be enjoyed in many ways. At ski areas you may see people using alpine, snowboard, telemark, cross country and other specialized ski equipment, such as that used by disabled or other skiers. Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below and share with other skiers the responsibility for a great skiing experience.

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  1. Always stay in control.
  2. People ahead of you have the right of way.
  3. Stop in a safe place for you and others.
  4. Whenever starting downhill or merging, look uphill and yield.
  5. Use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe signs and warnings, and keep off closed trails.
  7. Know how to use the lifts safely.

Be safety conscious and KNOW THE CODE. IT'S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.


Officially endorsed by: NATIONAL SKI AREAS ASSOCIATION. Visit www.nsaa.org

 

Lids On Kids
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With the increasing popularity of helmets during the past few years many parents are considering a helmet for their child. The National Ski Areas Association (NSAA), together with the help of many others in the ski industry, has developed this site to help educate parents about putting helmets on their children while they're on the slopes.


NSAA, the trade association for ski areas across the country, promotes the use of helmets. It's up to you to educate yourself about their benefits and limitations.

 

Visit www.lidsonkids.org

 

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Sun Safety on the Mountain
The high altitude and reflective surface of snow on the mountain increases the amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation that you receive. Protect your skin and eyes by always wearing:

  • Sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or greater
  • Lip Balm with an SPF 15 or greater
  • Hat
  • Sunglasses or Goggles 

Don't ruin your ski vacation by getting sunburn! 

Visit www.gosunsmart.org

 

Mountain Environment

  • Echo Mountain is located at high altitude, above 10,000ft and therefore has less oxygen in the atmosphere than lower altitudes. People coming from lower elevations may experience high altitude sickness.
  • Symptoms of high altitude sickness include headaches, nausea, loss of appetite, insomnia, coughing, and difficulty breathing.
  • To avoid high altitude sickness, take it easy your first day and be sure to drink plenty of water. Decrease salt, alcohol and caffeine use. Eat lots of carbohydrate-rich foods and avoid fatty foods.
  • If any of these conditions persist or you have concerns about your health, visit Ski Patrol. Be aware that high elevations can also exacerbate existing health problems. Talk to your doctor or a medical professional before your vacation.

Visit www.gosunsmart.org

What to Wear

Dress in layers so you will be prepared for changing weather conditions. Cover your skin, even during warm, spring weather conditions.

Ideal Base Layers

  • Long underwear, preferably polypropylene, polyester, or wool/polyester blend
  • Avoid wearing base layers made of cotton; it retains moisture and will not keep you as warm
  • A turtleneck or long sleeve shirt, then a sweater or fleece
  • Ski or snowboarding socks that are thin and made of wool or polyester

Ideal Outer Layers

  • Jacket and pants that are warm, water resistant and comfortable
  • Gloves or mittens (mittens are warmer)
  • A hat or helmet that covers your ears
  • Sunglasses or goggles

Always remember to put sunscreen on all areas of exposed skin. Don’t forget your ears and neck!

Visit www.gosunsmart.org

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